12.9.2 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices – Physical Mode Answers

Last Updated on June 9, 2021 by Admin

12.9.2 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices – Physical Mode Answers

   CCNA 1 v7 & 7.02   
Final Exam Answers
CCNA 1 7.02 - Modules 11 - 13
Modules 11 - 13 Exam Answers Online Test
CCNA 1 7.02 - Modules 14 - 15
Modules 14 - 15 Exam Answers Online Test
CCNA 1 ITN v7.02 - Packet Tracer Activities Answers & Solutions
11.5.5 Packet Tracer – Subnet an IPv4 Network Answers
11.7.5 Packet Tracer – Subnetting Scenario Answers
11.9.3 Packet Tracer – VLSM Design and Implementation Practice Answers
11.10.1 Packet Tracer – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme Answers
11.10.2 Packet Tracer – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme – Physical Mode
12.6.6 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addressing Answers
12.9.1 Packet Tracer – Implement a Subnetted IPv6 Addressing Scheme Answers
12.9.2 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices – Physical Mode Answers
13.2.6 Packet Tracer – Verify IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing Answers
13.2.7 Packet Tracer – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity Answers
13.3.1 Packet Tracer – Use ICMP to Test and Correct Network Connectivity Answers
13.3.2 Packet Tracer – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity – Physical Mode Answers
CCNA 1 ITN v7.02 - Student Lab Answers & Solutions
11.6.6 Lab – Calculate IPv4 Subnets Answers
11.10.2 Lab – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme Answers
12.7.4 Lab – Identify IPv6 Addresses Answers
12.9.2 Lab – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices Answers
13.3.2 Lab – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity Answers

Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices – Physical Mode (Answers Version)

Answers Note: Red font color or gray highlights indicate text that appears in the Answers copy only.

Topology

This topology has two PCs, a router R1 and a switch S1. PC-A is connected to switch S1 F0/6. Switch S1 F0/5 is connected to R1 G0/0/1. Router R1 g0/0/0 is connected to PC-B.

Addressing Table

Device

Interface

IPv6 Address

Prefix Length

Default Gateway

R1

G0/0/0

2001:db8:acad:a::1

64

N/A

R1

G0/0/1

2001:db8:acad:1::1

64

N/A

S1

VLAN 1

2001:db8:acad:1::b

64

N/A (fe80::1)

PC-A

NIC

2001:db8:acad:1::3

64

fe80::1

PC-B

NIC

2001:db8:acad:a::3

64

fe80::1

Blank Line – no additional information

Objectives

Part 1: Set Up Topology and Configure Basic Router and Switch Settings

Part 2: Configure IPv6 Addresses Manually

Part 3: Verify End-to-End Connectivity

Background / Scenario

In this Packet Tracer Physical Mode (PTPM) activity, you will configure hosts and device interfaces with IPv6 addresses. You will issue show commands to view IPv6 unicast addresses. You will use ping and traceroute commands to verify end-to-end connectivity.

Instructions

Part 1:Cable the Network and Configure Basic Router and Switch Settings

In this part, you will cable the network, power the devices, and then configure the router and switch with basic device settings.

Step 1:Cable the network and power the devices.

Cable the network according to the topology. Power the devices as needed.

Step 2:Configure the router.

Assign the hostname and configure the basic device settings.

Step 3:Configure the switch.

Assign the hostname and configure the basic device settings.

Part 2:Configure IPv6 Addresses Manually

In this part, you willmanually configure IPv6 addressing on all the devices in the network.

Step 1:Assign the IPv6 addresses to Ethernet interfaces on R1.

  1. Assign the IPv6 global unicast addresses, listed in the Addressing Table, to both Ethernet interfaces on R1.

Open configuration window

R1(config)# interface g0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:a::1/64

R1(config-if)# no shutdown

R1(config-if)# interface g0/0/1

R1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:1::1/64

R1(config-if)# no shutdown

R1(config-if)# end

Answers Note: The IPv6 global prefix 2001:db8::/32 is a reserved prefix for use in documentation, as described in RFC 3849.

  1. Verify that the correct IPv6 unicast address is assigned to each interface.

R1# show ipv6 interface brief

GigabitEthernet0/0/0[up/up]

FE80::201:63FF:FE06:C001

2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1

GigabitEthernet0/0/1[up/up]

FE80::201:63FF:FE06:C002

2001:DB8:ACAD:1::1

<output omitted>

Note: The link-local address (fe80::) displayed is based on EUI-64 addressing, which automatically uses the interface Media Access Control (MAC) address to create a 128-bit IPv6 link-local address.

  1. To get the link-local address to match the global unicast address on the interface, manually enter the link-local addresses on each of the Ethernet interfaces on R1.

R1# config t

Enter configuration commands, one per line.End with CNTL/Z.

R1(config)# interface g0/0/0

R1(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local

R1(config-if)# interface g0/0/1

R1(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::1 link-local

R1(config-if)# end

Note: Each router interface belongs to a separate network. Packets with a link-local address never leave the local network; therefore, you can use the same link-local address on both interfaces.

  1. Use a command of your choice to verify that the link-local address has been changed to fe80::1.

R1# show ipv6 interface g0/0/0

GigabitEthernet0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up

IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::1

No Virtual link-local address(es):

Global unicast address(es):

2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64

Joined group address(es):

FF02::1

FF02::1:FF00:1

MTU is 1500 bytes

<output omitted>

Close configuration window

Question:

Which two multicast groups have been assigned to interface G0/0/0?

Type your answers here.

The all-nodes multicast group (FF02::1) and the solicited nodes multicast group (ff02::1:ff00:1).

Step 2:Enable IPv6 routing on R1.

  1. From a PC-B command prompt, enter the ipconfig command to examine the IPv6 address information assigned to the PC interface.

Question:

Has an IPv6 unicast address been assigned to the network interface card (NIC) on PC-B?

Type your answers here.

No

  1. Use the IPv6 unicast-routing command to enable IPv6 routing on R1.

Open configuration window

R1# configure terminal

R1(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing

R1(config)# exit

  1. Use a command to verify the new multicast group is assigned to interface G0/0/0. Notice that the all-router multicast group (ff02::2) now appears for interface G0/0/0.

Note: This will allow the PCs to obtain the IP address and default gateway information automatically using Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC).

R1# show ipv6 interface g0/0/0

GigabitEthernet0/0/0 is up, line protocol is up

IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::1

No Virtual link-local address(es):

Global unicast address(es):

2001:DB8:ACAD:A::1, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:A::/64

Joined group address(es):

FF02::1

FF02::2

FF02::1:FF00:1

MTU is 1500 bytes

<partial output omitted>

Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.

  1. Now that R1 is part of the all-router multicast group FF02::2, from PC-B re-issue the ipconfig command and examine the IPv6 address information.

Question:

Why did PC-B receive the Global Routing Prefix and Subnet ID that you configured on R1?

Type your answers here.

On R1 all IPv6 interfaces are now part of the All-router multicast group, FF02::2. This enables the router to send Router Advertisement (RA) messages with the prefix information to all nodes on the LAN. Notice that R1 also sent the RA message using its link-local address, fe80::1, as the source IPv6 address of the packet. Devices will use this as their Default Gateway address. When using SLAAC, to ensure correct results, the router’s interface should use a /64 prefix length.

Step 3:Assign IPv6 addresses to the management interface (SVI) on S1.

  1. Assign the IPv6 address for S1. Also assign a link-local address for this interface.

S1(config)# interface vlan 1

S1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:db8:acad:1::b/64

S1(config-if)# ipv6 address fe80::b link-local

S1(config-if)# end

Note: The switch will automatically receive its default gateway address from the RA message sent by the router. It will use the source IPv6 address of the RA message, which is the router’s link-local address. However, your version of Packet Tracer may not yet support this on the switch.

  1. Use a command of your choice to verify that the IPv6 addresses are properly assigned to the management interface.

S1# show ipv6 interface vlan1

Vlan1 is up, line protocol is up

IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::B

No Virtual link-local address(es):

Global unicast address(es):

2001:DB8:ACAD:1::B, subnet is 2001:DB8:ACAD:1::/64

Joined group address(es):

FF02::1

FF02::1:FF00:B

MTU is 1500 bytes

ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds

ICMP redirects are enabled

ICMP unreachables are sent

Output features: Check hwidb

ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1

ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds (using 30000)

ND NS retransmit interval is 1000 milliseconds

Close configuration window

Step 4:Assign static IPv6 addresses to the PCs.

  1. Open the IP Configuration window on each PC and assign IPv6 addressing.
  2. Verify both PCs have the correct IPv6 address information. Each PC should have two Global IPv6 addresses: one static and one SLAAC.

Part 3:Verify End-to-End Connectivity

  1. From PC-A, ping fe80::1. This is the link-local address assigned to G0/0/1 on R1.
  2. From PC-A, use the tracert command to verify that you have end-to-end connectivity to PC-B.
  3. From PC-B, ping PC-A.
  4. From PC-B, ping the link-local address for G0/0/0 on R1.

Note: If end-to-end connectivity is not established, troubleshoot your IPv6 address assignments to verify that you entered the addresses correctly on all devices.

Reflection Questions

  1. Why can the same link-local address, fe80::1, be assigned to both Ethernet interfaces on R1?

Type your answers here.

Link-local packets never leave the local network, so the same link-local address can be used on an interface associated to a different local network.

  1. What is the Subnet ID of the IPv6 unicast address 2001:db8:acad::aaaa:1234/64, if the global routing prefix is a /48?

Type your answers here.

0 (zero) or 0000 (zeros). If the global routing prefix is a /48, this would include the first three hextets. The fourth hextet would therefore be the Subnet ID of an IPv6 address with a prefix of /64. In the example, the fourth hextet contains all zeros and the IPv6 Omitting All 0 Segment rule is using the double colon to depict the Subnet ID and the first two hextets of the Interface ID. This is why the prefix of the Global unicast address of 2001:acad::aaaa:1234/64 is 2001:db8:acad::/64

   CCNA 1 v7 & 7.02   
Final Exam Answers
CCNA 1 7.02 - Modules 11 - 13
Modules 11 - 13 Exam Answers Online Test
CCNA 1 7.02 - Modules 14 - 15
Modules 14 - 15 Exam Answers Online Test
CCNA 1 ITN v7.02 - Packet Tracer Activities Answers & Solutions
11.5.5 Packet Tracer – Subnet an IPv4 Network Answers
11.7.5 Packet Tracer – Subnetting Scenario Answers
11.9.3 Packet Tracer – VLSM Design and Implementation Practice Answers
11.10.1 Packet Tracer – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme Answers
11.10.2 Packet Tracer – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme – Physical Mode
12.6.6 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addressing Answers
12.9.1 Packet Tracer – Implement a Subnetted IPv6 Addressing Scheme Answers
12.9.2 Packet Tracer – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices – Physical Mode Answers
13.2.6 Packet Tracer – Verify IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing Answers
13.2.7 Packet Tracer – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity Answers
13.3.1 Packet Tracer – Use ICMP to Test and Correct Network Connectivity Answers
13.3.2 Packet Tracer – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity – Physical Mode Answers
CCNA 1 ITN v7.02 - Student Lab Answers & Solutions
11.6.6 Lab – Calculate IPv4 Subnets Answers
11.10.2 Lab – Design and Implement a VLSM Addressing Scheme Answers
12.7.4 Lab – Identify IPv6 Addresses Answers
12.9.2 Lab – Configure IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices Answers
13.3.2 Lab – Use Ping and Traceroute to Test Network Connectivity Answers
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