26.1.6 Lab – Implement CoPP Answers

Last Updated on February 27, 2021 by Admin

26.1.6 Lab – Implement CoPP Answers

Lab – Implement CoPP (Answers Version)

Answers Note: Red font color or gray highlights indicate text that appears in the instructor copy only.

Topology

This topology has 2 routers and 1 switch. A1 fa0/1 is connected to R1 g0/0/1. R1 G0/0/0 is connected R2 G0/0/0.

Addressing Table

Device

Interface

IP Address

Subnet Mask

R1

G0/0/0

172.16.12.1

255.255.255.252

R1

G0/0/1

10.10.1.1

255.255.255.0

R2

G0/0/0

172.16.12.2

255.255.255.252

A1

VLAN 1

10.10.1.4

255.255.255.0

Objectives

Part 1: Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

Part 2: Verify Initial Connectivity

Part 3: Implement a CoPP Policy on R1

Part 4: Verify the CoPP Policy on R1

Part 5: (Challenge) Further Classify Default Traffic

Background / Scenario

Control Plane Policing (CoPP) is a protection feature for the router’s control plane CPU. CoPP can granularly permit, drop, or rate-limit traffic to or from the CPU using a Modular QoS CLI (MQC) policy. The CoPP policy is applied to a dedicated control-plane interface which protects the CPU from unexpected extreme rates of traffic that could impact the stability of the router.

CoPP handles all process-switched traffic, such as packets logged by an ACL or IP packets with header (TTL) options. Other types of traffic directed to the control plane include routing updates, (OSPF, EIGRP and BGP) as well as management traffic, including Telnet, SNMP, SSH, NTP, and HTTP etc.

The focus of this lab is using the Cisco IOS Modular QoS CLI (MQC) to implement CoPP.

Note: This lab is an exercise in configuring CoPP policies and does not necessarily reflect network best practices.

Note: The routers used with CCNP hands-on labs are Cisco 4221 with Cisco IOS XE Release 16.9.4 (universalk9 image). The switch used in the lab is a Cisco Catalyst 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2) (lanbasek9 image). Other routers, switches, and Cisco IOS versions can be used. Depending on the model and Cisco IOS version, the commands available and the output produced might vary from what is shown in the labs. Refer to the Router Interface Summary Table at the end of the lab for the correct interface identifiers.

Note: Make sure that the routers and switches have been erased and have no startup configurations. If you are unsure, contact your instructor.

Answers Note: Refer to the Answers Lab Manual for the procedures to initialize and reload devices.

Required Resources

  • 2 Routers (Cisco 4221 with Cisco IOS XE Release 16.9.4 universal image or comparable)
  • 1 Switch (Cisco 2960 with Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2) lanbasek9 image or comparable)
  • 1 PC (Choice of operating system with terminal emulation program and a packet capture utility installed)
  • Console cables to configure the Cisco IOS devices via the console ports
  • Ethernet cables as shown in the topology

Part 1:Build the Network and Configure Basic Device Settings

In Part 1, you will set up the network topology and configure basic settings and interface addressing on devices.

Step 1:Cable the network as shown in the topology.

Attach the devices as shown in the topology diagram, and cable as necessary.

Step 2:Configure basic settings for each device.

  1. Console into each device, enter global configuration mode, and apply the basic settings. The startup configurations for each device are provided below.

Open configuration window

Router R1

hostname R1

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name CCNPv8.CoPP.Lab

username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type scrypt secret cisco123

banner motd # R1, Control Plane Policing #

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

exit

interface g0/0/1

ip address 10.10.1.1 255.255.255.0

no shutdown

exit

interface g0/0/0

ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.252

no shutdown

exit

router eigrp 123

eigrp router-id 0.0.0.1

network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3

network 10.10.1.0 0.0.0.255

exit

line vty 0 4

login local

transport input telnet ssh

exit

crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024

end

Router R2

hostname R2

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name CCNPv8.CoPP.Lab

username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type scrypt secret cisco123

banner motd # R2, Control Plane Policing#

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

exit

interface g0/0/0

ip address 172.16.12.2 255.255.255.252

no shutdown

exit

router eigrp 123

eigrp router-id 0.0.0.2

network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3

exit

line vty 0 4

login local

transport input telnet ssh

exit

crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024

end

Switch A1

hostname A1

no ip domain lookup

username admin privilege 15 algorithm-type scrypt secret cisco123

ip domain name CCNPv8.COPP.LAB

banner motd # A1, Control Plane Policing #

spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

exit

line vty 0 15

login local

transport input telnet ssh

interface range f0/1-24, g0/1-2

shutdown

exit

interface range f0/1

switchport mode access

no shutdown

exit

interface vlan 1

ip address 10.10.1.4 255.255.255.0

no shut

exit

ip default-gateway 10.10.1.1

crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024

end

  1. Set the clock on each device to UTC time.
  2. Save the running configuration to startup-config.
  3. Verify ICMP connectivity between the devices.

Close configuration window

Part 2:Verify Initial Connectivity

It is always advisable to test network connectivity and services before applying any policies. This ensures that the network is fully functional, and that the loss of connectivity or functionality is due to the applied policy and not a pre-existing network issue.

When testing TCP connectivity, some services will prompt for a username/password. The pre-configured username is admin and password is cisco123.

Step 1:Test Telnet connectivity.

Open configuration window

From A1, test Telnet connectivity to R1 and R2. When prompted for a username / password use admin and cisco123. You should be successful. Troubleshoot as needed.

Step 2:Test SSH connectivity.

From A1, test SSH connectivity to R1 and R2. When prompted for a username / password use admin and cisco123. You should be successful. Troubleshoot as needed.

Close configuration window

Part 3:Implement a CoPP Policy on R1

In this part, you will configure ACLs to identify traffic flows. You will then use these ACLs in class maps to classify the traffic for CoPP. Next, you will bind the class maps to a CoPP policy map. This policy map will apply the policing and actions to take for each class map. Finally, you will apply the policy map to the control plane.

Step 1:Configure named ACLs to identify traffic flows.

Understanding what is needed for traffic classification can be achieved from network protocol analysis. Cisco NetFlow and Embedded Packet Capture (EPC) can be used to classify network traffic.

After the traffic has been identified, ACLs can be built for matching the identified traffic. The definition of these ACLs is one of the most critical steps in the CoPP process. MQC uses these ACLs to define the traffic classes. Appropriate granularity in the classification of these protocols within these ACLs allows for better protection of the control plane CPU.

  1. Configure an extended ACL using the name TELNET to identify Telnet traffic.

Open configuration window

R1(config)# ip access-list extended TELNET

R1(config-extnacl)# permit tcp any any eq 23

R1(config-extnacl)# exit

  1. Configure an extended ACL using the name EIGRP to identify all EIGRP traffic.

R1(config)# ip access-list extended EIGRP

R1(config-extnacl)# permit eigrp any any

R1(config-extnacl)# exit

  1. Configure an extended ACL using the name SSH to identify all SSH traffic.

R1(config)# ip access-list extended SSH

R1(config-extnacl)# permit tcp any any eq 22

R1(config-extnacl)# exit

  1. Configure an extended ACL using the name ICMP to identify ICMP traffic.

R1(config)# ip access-list extended ICMP

R1(config-extnacl)# permit icmp any any

R1(config-extnacl)# exit

Note: Packets not matching any permit statements will be sent to the control plane CPU on R1.

Step 2:Configure class maps for CoPP on R1.

Class maps are used to classify traffic for CoPP. The ACLs defined previously specify which IP packets belong to which classes. The mapping of ACLs to class maps completes the traffic classification process.

Class maps support multiple match criteria; however, in this configuration a single-match criteria will satisfy basic functionality.

  1. Configure a class map named CMTELNET to match IP packets that should be dropped and never reach the control plane CPU.

R1(config)# class-map match-all CM-TELNET

R1(config-cmap)# match access-group name TELNET

R1(config-cmap)# exit

  1. Configure a class map named CMEIGRP to match EIGRP packets. This will allow you to apply a policy to these routing packets. The same could be done for OSPF or BGP packets if those routing protocols were active.

R1(config)# class-map match-all CM-EIGRP

R1(config-cmap)# match access-group name EIGRP

R1(config-cmap)# exit

  1. Configure a class map named CM-SSH to match IP packets in the ACL named SSH. These IP packets are SSH packets destined to the management plane.

R1(config)# class-map match-all CM-SSH

R1(config-cmap)# match access-group name SSH

R1(config-cmap)# exit

  1. Configure a class map named CMICMP to match IP packets in the ACL named ICMP. These IP packets are ICMP packets destined to the router.

R1(config)# class-map match-all CM-ICMP

R1(config-cmap)# match access-group name ICMP

R1(config-cmap)# exit

Step 3:Configure a policy map for CoPP on R1.

The policy map defines the “baseline” service policy for each traffic classification. For each traffic class previously configured, the policy map applies the control plane policing rates and actions.

Finding the optimal police rate without impacting network stability requires understanding traffic flows over time. To guarantee that CoPP does not introduce stability issues, the violate action should be set to transmit for all vital classes. When the CoPP policy is confirmed to be operationally effective, that would be the time to convert the appropriate “exceed-action” transmit actions to drop actions.

  1. Configure a policy map named PMCOPP on R1.

R1(config)# policy-map PM-COPP

  1. Associate the traffic class maps to the policy map and configure the following policing and action policies:
  • For Telnet packets, configure policing at 8 kbps. Then set the conform action to drop and the exceed action to drop. This will effectively drop all Telnet packets that match the class map.
  • For EIGRP packets, configure policing at 20 packets per second (pps). Then set the conform action to transmit and the exceed action to drop.
  • For SSH packets, configure the policing at 50 kbps, set the conform action to transmit and the exceed action to transmit. This will effectively transmit all SSH packets that match the class map.
  • For ICMP packet, configure policing at 10pps. Then set the conform action to transmit and the exceed action to drop.

R1(config-pmap)# class CM-TELNET

R1(config-pmap-c)# police 8000 conform-action drop exceed-action drop

R1(config-pmap-c-police)# exit

R1(config-pmap-c)# class CM-EIGRP

R1(config-pmap-c)# police rate 10 pps conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit

R1(config-pmap-c-police)# exit

R1(config-pmap-c)# class CM-SSH

R1(config-pmap-c)# police 50000 conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit

R1(config-pmap-c-police)# exit

R1(config-pmap-c)# class CM-ICMP

R1(config-pmap-c)# police rate 10 pps conform-action transmit exceed-action drop

R1(config-pmap-c-police)# exit

  1. Associate the default class map with the traffic policy. Set the class to class-default and configure policing at 12 kbps. Then set the conform action to transmit and the exceed action to transmit.

R1(config-pmap-c)# class class-default

R1(config-pmap-c)# police 12000 conform-action transmit exceed-action transmit

R1(config-pmap-c-police)# end

Note: The class class-default is automatically placed at the end of the policy map. By the nature of CoPPmatching mechanisms, certain traffic types will always end up falling into the default class. This includes Layer 2 keepalives and non-IP traffic. Because these traffic types are required to maintain the network control plane, the class-default should never be policed with both conform and exceed actions set to drop.

Step 4:Apply the CoPP policy to the control plane virtual interface on R1.

The policy map is applied to the control plane virtual interface in the inbound direction using the service-policy command. Only traffic destined for the router’s control plane will be affected by the CoPP policy.

  1. Enter control plane configuration mode to apply a CoPP policy.

R1# conf t

R1(config)# control-plane

  1. Next, attach the policy map to the control plane interface using the service-policy input command and specify the policy map named PM–COPP on the control plane virtual interface.

R1(config-cp)# service-policy input PM-COPP

R1(config-cp)# end

Close configuration window

Part 4:Verify the CoPP Policy on R1.

Within a few moments of the CoPP policy being applied, dynamic information can be seen about the actual policy including rate information and the number of bytes and packets that conformed to or exceeded the configured policies.

Step 1:Issue the show access-list command.

The show access-list command identifies specific traffic for each ACL.

Open configuration window

R1# show access-lists

Extended IP access list EIGRP

10 permit eigrp any any

Extended IP access list ICMP

10 permit icmp any any

Extended IP access list SSH

10 permit tcp any any eq 22

Extended IP access list TELNET

10 permit tcp any any eq telnet

Step 2:Issue the show classmap command.

The only class maps configured are those used for CoPP. Notice the match-any statement under the class-default class map. The match statement was automatically added when the class map was included in the policy map configuration.

R1# show class-map

Class Map match-all CM-TELNET (id 1)

Match access-group name TELNET

Class Map match-any class-default (id 0)

Match any

Class Map match-all CM-ICMP (id 5)

Match access-group name ICMP

Class Map match-all CM-EIGRP (id 2)

Match access-group name EIGRP

Class Map match-all CM-SSH (id 3)

Match access-group name SSH

Step 3:Issue the show policymap command.

Notice the policy map shows the policing rates that were configured for each class map, including the class–default class map.

R1# show policy-map

Policy Map PM-COPP

Class CM-TELNET

police cir 8000 bc 1500

conform-action drop

exceed-action drop

Class CM-EIGRP

police rate 10 pps

conform-action transmit

exceed-action transmit

Class CM-SSH

police cir 50000 bc 1562

conform-action transmit

exceed-action transmit

Class CM-ICMP

police rate 10 pps

conform-action transmit

exceed-action drop

Class class-default

police cir 12000 bc 1500

conform-action transmit

exceed-action transmit

Step 4:Issue the show policy-map control-plane command.

This is the most useful command for verifying CoPP functionality. Notice that the EIGRP packets conform to the policing rule. Because no packets exceeded the defined rates for the EIGRP class map, all packets are transmitted to the control plane for processing. Note that your packet count will vary from the example below.

R1# show policy-map control-plane

Control Plane

Service-policy input: PM-COPP

Class-map: CM-TELNET (match-all)

0 packets, 0 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name TELNET

police:

cir 8000 bps, bc 1500 bytes

conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

drop

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

drop

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

Class-map: CM-EIGRP (match-all)

34 packets, 2516 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name EIGRP

police:

rate 10 pps, burst 2 packets

conformed 34 packets, 2516 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0 pps, exceeded 0 pps

Class-map: CM-SSH (match-all)

0 packets, 0 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name SSH

police:

cir 50000 bps, bc 1562 bytes

conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

Class-map: CM-ICMP (match-all)

0 packets, 0 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name ICMP

police:

rate 10 pps, burst 2 packets

conformed 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

drop

conformed 0 pps, exceeded 0 pps

Class-map: class-default (match-any)

333 packets, 19788 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: any

police:

cir 12000 bps, bc 1500 bytes

conformed 333 packets, 19788 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

close configuration window

Step 5:From R2, ping R1.

From R2, use the command ping 172.16.12.1 repeat 20 to simulate a DoS attach on the control plane on R1. Notice the success rate of 70 percent and the failed pings as indicated by the period symbol (.) among the (successful) exclamation marks. From the output above, this indicates that R1 is dropping every third ICMP packet, based on the policy for rate limiting ICMP traffic to the control plane on R1.

Open configuration window

R2# ping 172.16.12.1 repeat 20

Type escape sequence to abort.

Sending 20, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.12.1, timeout is 2 seconds:

!!.!!.!!.!!.!!.!!.!!

Success rate is 70 percent (14/20), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/2 ms

Step 6:From R2, access R1 via Telnet.

From R2 enter the telnet 172.17.12.1 command. Notice that all Telnet traffic to R1 is not successful. This is because our policy is to drop all Telnet traffic directed to the control plane on R1.

R2# telnet 172.16.12.1

Trying 172.16.12.1 …

% Connection timed out; remote host not responding

Step 7:From R2, access A1 via Telnet.

From R2, enter the telnet 10.10.1.4 command. When prompted for a username / password enter admin and cisco123. Notice that Telnet traffic from R2 through R1 to A1 is successful.

R2# telnet 10.10.1.4

Trying 10.10.1.4 … Open

A1, Control Plane Policing

User Access Verification

Username: admin

Password:

A1# exit

[Connection to 10.10.1.4 closed by foreign host]

Step 8:SSH from R2 to R1.

From R2 SSH into R1 using the ssh l admin 172.16.12.1 command. When prompted for a password enter cisco123. Then enter the show running-config command to generate SSH packets.

R2# ssh -l admin 172.16.12.1

Password:

R1, Control Plane Policing

R1# show running-config

Building configuration…

(output omitted)

R1# exit

[Connection to 172.16.12.1 closed by foreign host]

close configuration window

Step 9:Investigate the CoPP policy on R1.

  1. On R1, repeat the show policy-map control-plane command to investigate policing of ICMP, Telnet, SSH, EIGRP and other packets.

Note: Your packet counts will vary from the following output.

Open configuration window

R1# show policy-map control-plane

Control Plane

Service-policy input: PM-COPP

Class-map: CM-TELNET (match-all)

4 packets, 232 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name TELNET

police:

cir 8000 bps, bc 1500 bytes

conformed 4 packets, 232 bytes; actions:

drop

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

drop

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

Class-map: CM-EIGRP (match-all)

487 packets, 36038 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name EIGRP

police:

rate 10 pps, burst 2 packets

conformed 487 packets, 36038 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0 pps, exceeded 0 pps

Class-map: CM-SSH (match-all)

68 packets, 5776 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name SSH

police:

cir 50000 bps, bc 1562 bytes

conformed 68 packets, 5776 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

Class-map: CM-ICMP (match-all)

10 packets, 1000 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: access-group name ICMP

police:

rate 10 pps, burst 2 packets

conformed 7 packets, 700 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 3 packets, 300 bytes; actions:

drop

conformed 0 pps, exceeded 0 pps

Class-map: class-default (match-any)

4701 packets, 281816 bytes

5 minute offered rate 0000 bps, drop rate 0000 bps

Match: any

police:

cir 12000 bps, bc 1500 bytes

conformed 4701 packets, 281816 bytes; actions:

transmit

exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:

transmit

conformed 0000 bps, exceeded 0000 bps

close configuration window

  1. From the output above note the following:
  • Notice that all four Telnet packets were dropped.
  • All EIGRP packets conform to the policing rule and are forwarded the control plane for processing.
  • All SSH packets also conform to the policing rule and are forwarded to the control plane for processing.
  • Ping packets are rate limited to 10 pps. This allows a “burst” of two packets, with every third packet being dropped.

Part 5:(Challenge) Further Classify Default Traffic

Notice in the output of the show policy-map control-plane command that there is a substantial number of packets that are being matched to the class-default class map. One solution to help identify the source of these packets would be to configure a “CATCH-ALL” class map. This new class map would collect any remaining traffic that have not matched previous class maps and are destined to the device’s control plane. This CATCH-ALL class would prevent packets from ending up in the class-default class map. For example, an ACL called CATCH-ALL could be defined as follows:

Open configuration window

R1(config)# ip access-list extended CATCH-ALL

R1(config-extnacl)# permit icmp any any

R1(config-extnacl)# permit udp any any

R1(config-extnacl)# permit tcp any any

R1(config-extnacl)# permit ip any any

R1(config-extnacl)# exit

close configuration window

This ACL could be matched to a class map called CM-CATCH-ALL that could be policed to 50 kbps with a confirm action of transmit and an exceed action of drop.

Implement this new class map in your policy map, repeat the verifications in Part 4, and then view the output of the show policy-map control-plane command to see where this default traffic is classified.

Reflection Questions

  1. Why is R2 able to use Telnet through R1 to A1?

Type your answers here.

Telnet traffic from R2 through R1 to A1 is seen as data plane traffic and forwarded to A1.

  1. When initially deploying CoPP, how can you prevent disruption of legitimate control plane traffic?

Type your answers here.

Initially deploy COPP in “monitoring mode” without any aggressive drop actions. Configure transmit actions, even for traffic exceeding the police rate of your specific class.

Router Interface Summary Table

Router Model

Ethernet Interface #1

Ethernet Interface #2

Serial Interface #1

Serial Interface #2

1800

Fast Ethernet 0/0 (F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1 (F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

1900

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0 (G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1 (G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2801

Fast Ethernet 0/0 (F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1 (F0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)

Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

2811

Fast Ethernet 0/0 (F0/0)

Fast Ethernet 0/1 (F0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

2900

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0 (G0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/1 (G0/1)

Serial 0/0/0 (S0/0/0)

Serial 0/0/1 (S0/0/1)

4221

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/0 (G0/0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/1 (G0/0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)

Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

4300

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/0 (G0/0/0)

Gigabit Ethernet 0/0/1 (G0/0/1)

Serial 0/1/0 (S0/1/0)

Serial 0/1/1 (S0/1/1)

Note: To find out how the router is configured, look at the interfaces to identify the type of router and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all the combinations of configurations for each router class. This table includes identifiers for the possible combinations of Ethernet and Serial interfaces in the device. The table does not include any other type of interface, even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in Cisco IOS commands to represent the interface.

End of document

Device Configs

Router R1

R1# show running-config

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 2772 bytes

!

version 16.9

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

platform qfp utilization monitor load 80

no platform punt-keepalive disable-kernel-core

!

hostname R1

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

vrf definition Mgmt-intf

!

address-family ipv4

exit-address-family

!

address-family ipv6

exit-address-family

!

no aaa new-model

!

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name CCNPv8.CoPP.Lab

!

login on-success log

!

subscriber templating

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

username admin privilege 15 secret 9 $9$DeeR16VslSqQwM$DHvIvMYqMZ4z2iBOCR6xXZsWavU3BRSA4HLZG.B8NPE

!

redundancy

mode none

!

class-map match-all CM-TELNET

match access-group name TELNET

class-map match-all CM-ICMP

match access-group name ICMP

class-map match-all CM-EIGRP

match access-group name EIGRP

class-map match-all CM-SSH

match access-group name SSH

!

policy-map PM-COPP

class CM-TELNET

police 8000 conform-action dropexceed-action drop

class CM-EIGRP

police rate 10 pps conform-action transmitexceed-action transmit

class CM-SSH

police 50000 conform-action transmitexceed-action transmit

class CM-ICMP

police rate 10 pps conform-action transmitexceed-action drop

class class-default

police 12000 conform-action transmitexceed-action transmit

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0

ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

ip address 10.10.1.1 255.255.255.0

negotiation auto

!

interface Serial0/1/0

no ip address

!

interface Serial0/1/1

no ip address

!

router eigrp 123

network 10.10.1.0 0.0.0.255

network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3

eigrp router-id 0.0.0.1

!

ip forward-protocol nd

no ip http server

ip http secure-server

ip tftp source-interface GigabitEthernet0

!

ip access-list extended CATCH-ALL

permit icmp any any

permit udp any any

permit tcp any any

permit ip any any

ip access-list extended EIGRP

permit eigrp any any

ip access-list extended ICMP

permit icmp any any

ip access-list extended SSH

permit tcp any any eq 22

ip access-list extended TELNET

permit tcp any any eq telnet

!

control-plane

service-policy input PM-COPP

!

banner motd ^C R1, Control Plane Policing^C

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

transport input none

stopbits 1

line aux 0

stopbits 1

line vty 0 4

login local

transport input telnet ssh

!

end

Router R2

R2# show running-config

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 1810 bytes

!

version 16.9

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

platform qfp utilization monitor load 80

no platform punt-keepalive disable-kernel-core

!

hostname R2

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

no aaa new-model

!

no ip domain lookup

ip domain name CCNPv8.CoPP.Lab

!

login on-success log

!

subscriber templating

!

multilink bundle-name authenticated

!

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

username admin privilege 15 secret 9 $9$BpMc23YNSFD1Gr$4x3z8z07FbIZxPnS/0mK1e0qGLzi7GnmnqI3e0beNcA

!

redundancy

mode none

!

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/0

ip address 172.16.12.2 255.255.255.252

negotiation auto

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/0/1

no ip address

negotiation auto

!

!

router eigrp 123

network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3

eigrp router-id 0.0.0.2

!

ip forward-protocol nd

no ip http server

ip http secure-server

ip tftp source-interface GigabitEthernet0

!

!

control-plane

!

banner motd ^C R2, Control Plane Policing^C

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

transport input none

stopbits 1

line aux 0

stopbits 1

line vty 0 4

login local

transport input telnet ssh

!

end

Switch A1

A1# show running-config brief

Building configuration…

Current configuration : 2659 bytes

!

version 15.2

no service pad

service timestamps debug datetime msec

service timestamps log datetime msec

no service password-encryption

!

hostname A1

!

boot-start-marker

boot-end-marker

!

!

username admin privilege 15 secret 9 $9$q93nz/NOzZfxYL$PldFC0CJSzBd9qGi1CM6YhxEiB.d1hALRz1ItxMGaUs

no aaa new-model

system mtu routing 1500

!

no ip domain-lookup

ip domain-name CCNPv8.COPP.LAB

!

spanning-tree mode rapid-pvst

spanning-tree extend system-id

!

vlan internal allocation policy ascending

!

!

interface FastEthernet0/1

switchport mode access

!

interface FastEthernet0/2

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/3

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/4

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/5

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/6

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/7

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/8

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/9

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/10

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/11

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/12

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/13

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/14

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/15

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/16

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/17

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/18

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/19

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/20

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/21

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/22

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/23

shutdown

!

interface FastEthernet0/24

shutdown

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/1

shutdown

!

interface GigabitEthernet0/2

shutdown

!

interface Vlan1

ip address 10.10.1.4 255.255.255.0

!

ip default-gateway 10.10.1.1

ip http server

ip http secure-server

!

no vstack

banner motd ^C A1, Control Plane Policing^C

!

line con 0

exec-timeout 0 0

logging synchronous

line vty 0 4

login local

transport input telnet ssh

line vty 5 15

login local

transport input telnet ssh

!

end

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