3.4.3 Packet Tracer – Configure End Devices Answers

Last Updated on February 9, 2021 by Admin

3.4.3 Packet Tracer – Configure End Devices Answers

Packet Tracer – Configure End Devices (Answers Version)

Answers Note: Red font color or gray highlights indicate text that appears in the Answers copy only.

Objectives

  • Configure various end devices in Packet Tracer.

Background / Scenario

In this activity, you will construct a simple Packet Tracer network and complete basic configuration of end devices.

Instructions

Part 1:  Build the Topology.

Step 1:  Create the devices.

Deploy a 2960 switch, two PCs and a server.

If help is required, please refer to previous activities.

Step 2:  Connect the devices.

  1. Connect FastEthernet0 on PC0 to FastEthernet0/1 on Switch0 with a Copper Straight-Through cable.
  2. Connect FastEthernet0 on PC1 to FastEthernet0/2 on Switch0 with a Copper Straight-Through cable.
  3. Connect FastEthernet0 on Server0 to GigabitEthernet0/1 on Switch0 with a Copper Straight-Through cable.

Part 2:  Configure Static IP addresses.

Step 1:  Configure IP address for Server0.

  1. Click Server0.
  2. Click the Desktop tab.
  3. Click the IP Configuration icon.
  4. Verify the bullet Static is selected.
  5. Enter 192.168.1.1 in the IP Address field.
  6. Enter 255.255.255.0 in the Subnet Mask field as needed.
  7. Close the IP Configuration when done.

Step 2:  Configure IP address for the PCs.

  1. Click PC0.
  2. Click the Desktop tab.
  3. Click the IP Configuration icon.
  4. Verify the bullet Static is selected.
  5. Enter 192.168.1.2 in the IP Address field.
  6. Enter 255.255.255.0 in the Subnet Mask field as needed.
  7. Close the IP Configuration when done for PC0.
  8. Repeat the same procedure for PC1. Use 192.168.1.3 as the IP address for PC1.

Part 3:  Verify Connectivity.

Step 1:  Verify connectivity via the Command Prompt.

  1. Verify that all the link lights are green.
  2. Click PC0.
  3. Click the Desktop tab.
  4. Click Command Prompt to open the PC command line interface.
  5. At the prompt, enter ping 192.168.1.1.

C:\> ping 192.168.1.1

If you have done everything correctly, you should see the following output. Your output could vary, but the reply statements should be there. If the replies are not there, try redoing the device configuration to this point.

Pinging 192.168.1.1 with 32 bytes of data:

 

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=128

 

Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1:

Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),

Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:

Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

  1. You can also ping PC1. Navigate to the Command Prompt for PC1 and enter the command ping 192.168.1.3 at the prompt. The ping should be successful.
  2. Close the command prompt when finished.

Step 2:  Verify connectivity via the web browser.

  1. Click PC1.
  2. Click the Desktop tab.
  3. Click the Web Browser to open the web browser application.
  4. Enter 192.168.1.1 in the URL field and click Go. The Cisco Packet Tracer webpage should open.
  5. Close the web browser when finished.
  6. You can also use the web browser application on PC0 to display the Cisco Packet Tracer webpage. Navigate to PC0. From the Desktop tab, open Web Browser and enter 192.168.1.1 in the URL field.

Part 4:  Basic Switch Configuration

You will perform some basic configuration on a switch using the Config and CLI tabs in Packet Tracer.

Step 1:  The Config tab

  1. Click Switch0.
  2. Click the Config tab.

Note: The Config tab is not always available on physical networking equipment. Some simple devices only have config tabs. The config tab can be useful for basic learning of commands, especially for beginners.

The Config tab shows a list of components that can be configured on this device. We are not going to cover what these components are, as that is learned in a networking course, but we will show how to navigate and use the interface.

  1. The Global Settings allows a user to change the name of a device that displays in the workspace. It also allows for changing the internal name shown at the command line prompt as well as buttons for saving, loading, exporting, and erasing configuration files.

Double-click in the Hostname dialog box to highlight the word Switch. Enter Central to replace Switch as the hostname. Packet Tracer will display the IOS commands necessary to accomplish the name change in the Equivalent IOS Commands box. The commands displayed should be as follows:

Switch> enable

Switch# configure terminal

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

Switch(config)# hostname Central

Central(config)#

These would be the commands used from the command line interface or CLI to change the hostname. If you did not know how to do this from the CLI, the Config tab would show the necessary commands.

  1. Click the FastEthernet0/1 under the Interface heading to configure the FastEthernet0/1 interface.

In the Equivalent IOS Commands, the command interface FastEthernet0/1 is displayed in the Equivalent IOS Commands box.

Step 2:  The CLI tab

  1. Select the CLI tab to switch to the CLI interface. Notice that the same commands that were in the Equivalent IOS Commands box are listed in the CLI window.
  2. At the prompt, enter shutdown.

Central(config-if)# shutdown

Central(config-if)#

%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet0/1, changed state to administratively down

%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/1, changed state to down

Central(config-if)#

This command just shuts down the interface down from the command line.

  1. Navigate to the Workspace. Notice that the link lights for the connection between PC0 and Switch0 are red. Because the interface on the switch was shut down, the connection is no longer active and shows red.
  2. Save and close the activity, then exit Packet Tracer if desired.
5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments