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A network administrator is troubleshooting an OSPF problem that involves neighbor adjacency. What should the administrator do?

  • Make sure that the router ID is included in the hello packet.
  • Make sure that the hello and dead interval timers are the same on all routers.
  • Make sure that the router priority is unique on each router.
  • Make sure that the DR/BDR election is complete.
Explanation & Hint:

When troubleshooting an OSPF problem that involves neighbor adjacency, the network administrator should focus on the aspects that directly impact the formation and maintenance of OSPF neighbor relationships. Here are the steps they should consider:

  1. Make sure that the hello and dead interval timers are the same on all routers.
    • This is a critical step. OSPF routers must have matching Hello and Dead interval timers to form a neighbor relationship. These timers are advertised in OSPF Hello packets, and if they don’t match between neighboring routers, the routers will not become neighbors.
  2. Make sure that the DR/BDR election is complete.
    • While ensuring the DR (Designated Router) and BDR (Backup Designated Router) election is complete can be important in some OSPF scenarios, it’s not typically a direct cause of OSPF neighbor adjacency issues. However, understanding the status of the DR/BDR election can be useful in complex network topologies, especially in broadcast and non-broadcast multi-access networks.

The other options are less directly related to solving OSPF neighbor adjacency issues:

  • Router ID in the hello packet: The router ID is indeed included in OSPF Hello packets, but it’s not something that typically needs to be “checked” for troubleshooting, as it’s automatically included. However, ensuring that each router in the OSPF network has a unique router ID is important.
  • Router priority uniqueness: The OSPF router priority is used in the DR/BDR election process on broadcast and non-broadcast networks. It does not need to be unique on each router. In fact, routers can have the same priority, and it’s a common configuration. The priority affects which router becomes the DR or BDR, but having the same priority is not inherently a problem for neighbor adjacency.

For more Questions and Answers:

CCNA 3 v7 – ENSA v7.02 Final Exam Answers Full 100%

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