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Match the feature of the diamond model to the corresponding explanation.

  • when the event occurred, broken into start and end times ==> time stamp
  • A group of events, similar to the phases of the kill chain. The diamond model does not assume that there will always be seven phases to an attack, and leaves it up to the intrusion analyst to determine what phases an adversary is using. ==> phase
  • The post condition of the adversary’s operation may not always be known, but can be modeled by selecting success, failure, or unknown. ==> result
  • Denotes where the event’s actions started. Typically, adversary-to-victim or victim-to-adversary, with infrastructure being an intermediary in either case. ==> direction
  • A generic class of activity that the adversary has used, such as distributed denial of service or spear-phishing attacks. ==> methodology
  • Any external resources that are used by the adversary, such as software, hardware, or money. ==> resources
Explanation & Hint:

Let’s match each feature of the Diamond Model to the corresponding explanation:

when the event occurred, broken into start and end times ==> Time Stamp

The “Time Stamp” in the Diamond Model refers to the timing of the event, indicating when it began and when it ended.
A group of events, similar to the phases of the kill chain. The diamond model does not assume that there will always be seven phases to an attack, and leaves it up to the intrusion analyst to determine what phases an adversary is using. ==> Phase

The “Phase” aspect of the Diamond Model refers to the stages or steps of an intrusion, similar to how the kill chain model breaks down an attack into phases.
The post condition of the adversary’s operation may not always be known, but can be modeled by selecting success, failure, or unknown. ==> Result

The “Result” in the Diamond Model denotes the outcome of the adversary’s operation, which can be categorized as success, failure, or unknown.
Denotes where the event’s actions started. Typically, adversary-to-victim or victim-to-adversary, with infrastructure being an intermediary in either case. ==> Direction

The “Direction” feature in the Diamond Model indicates the initiation point of the event’s actions, such as whether it was initiated by the adversary towards the victim or vice versa.
A generic class of activity that the adversary has used, such as distributed denial of service or spear-phishing attacks. ==> Methodology

The “Methodology” in the Diamond Model refers to the general class or type of activity used by the adversary, like specific attack types or strategies.
Any external resources that are used by the adversary, such as software, hardware, or money. ==> Resources

The “Resources” aspect of the Diamond Model encompasses the external resources utilized by the adversary, which could include tools like software, hardware, or financial assets.

For more Questions and Answers:

Threat Analysis Post-Assessment | CBROPS

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