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  • Post category:Blog
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  • Post last modified:June 12, 2024

Which line of code must you insert in order for the program to produce the expected output?
Expected output:

1

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()

{
       int var = 1;
       print("%d \n", var);
  • }
    placed at the end of the code block
  • return 0;
    placed at the end of the code block
  • int var;
    placed above int var = 1;
  • No change are required – the program will compile and produce the expected output
Explanation & Hints:

The existing code snippet you provided has a typo in the function used to print the variable var. Instead of print, it should be printf. Here’s the correct version of your code to produce the expected output:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int var = 1;
    printf("%d \n", var);
    return 0;
}

So, to answer your question on which line of code must be inserted, “No change are required – the program will compile and produce the expected output” is incorrect due to the typo. The correct function printf must be used instead of print. Once you replace print with printf, the code will compile and produce the expected output, and including return 0; at the end of the main function is a good practice to indicate that the program ended successfully.

For more Questions and Answers:

Introduction to computer programming, variables, and comments Module 1 Test Answers Full 100%

 

Which line of code must you insert in order for the program to produce the expected output?

Expected output:

1

Code:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    var = 1;
    printf("%d \n", var);
    return 0;
}
  • int var;
    placed above var = 1;
  • int var;
    placed below var = 1;
  • int var;
    placed below printf("%d \n", var);
  • No change are required – the program will compile and produce the expceted output
Explanation & Hints:

The code has an issue because the variable var is used in the main function before it’s declared and defined. Here’s the relevant part of the code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
var = 1;
printf("%d \n", var);
return 0;
}
int var;

In this layout, var is declared after its usage in main, which is not valid in C. C requires that variables be declared before they are used. This means you need to declare var at a scope accessible to main before it is used.

To fix the code, you should place the declaration of var at a global level before the main function begins. This would make var a global variable accessible within main and correctly initialized before it’s used. Here’s how you should modify the code:

#include <stdio.h>

int var;

int main()
{
var = 1;
printf("%d \n", var);
return 0;
}

The correct choice is:

  • placed above var = 1;

This option places the declaration of var where it needs to be for the code to compile successfully and produce the expected output of 1.

For more Questions and Answers:

Basic data types, operations, and flow control (decision-making statements) Module 2 Test Answers Full 100%

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